Yes Baby I Like It Raw

Raw PIzza
Plato’s Live Greek Pizza
4-6 hours soaking/12-15 hours dehydrating/2-3 servings
1 C Raw buckwheat grouts (soaked for 4-6 hours)
1 C Macadamia nuts soaked and drained
3 Tbl Flax seed, ground
2 1/2 Tbl Herbs, minced (try basil and parsley)
1 Tbl Lemon juice, fresh squeezed
Pinch Crushed red peppers
Sea Salt, to tast
Black Pepper, ground to taste
Nama shoyu to taste (optional)

Cheez
1 Cup Cashew Nut cheez (recipe below)
Sauce
1 Cup Live Tomato (recipe below)
Toppings
Sun dried tomatoes, olives, basil, fresh mushrooms, or other veggies
Preparation
Prepare Nut Cheez the night below (see below)
Soak buckwheat, rinsing and replacing water periodically. Rinse and drain well one last time, place in food processor with remaining crust ingredients and process until smooth.
Carefully lay out 1/2” think circle layer on Teflex dehydrator sheet. Dehydrate at 115 degrees until crust is dry, approximately 12-15 hours, flipping once to ensure even drying. Transfer directly to a mesh screen dehydrator tray.
Prepare Live Tomato Sauce or Pesto sauce spread on top of crust, add fresh vegetable toppings.
Cheez Cashew
2 C Cashews
1 C Filtered Water
1/3 cup red bell pepper, diced
2 1/2 Tbl green onion diced
2 Tbl Cilantro
1 tsp Garlic, minced
1 tsp, Nama Shoyum or to taste
1/4 tsp  Sea Salt
Pinch Curshed red pepper flakes
 Blend cashews with filtered water until very smooth. Place in a 1/2 gallon open-mouthed jar. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and secure with rubber band. Cover with a towel and allow to sit in a warm place overnight. 
Pour cashew mixture into large mixing bowl, combine with remaining ingredients and mix well.
Variations
~Can be made with macadamia nuts or pine nuts.
~Replace cilantro with other fresh herbs.

Live Tomato Sauce
20 minites for 2 1/2 cups
2 C Roma tomatoes, chopped
1/4 C Sundried tomatoes soaked in warm water until soft
2 Tbl beets, grated
2 Tbl Oiive oil
1 Tbl Basil, minced
1 Tbl Italian parsley, minced
1 tsp Nama shoyu, or to taste
1 tsp Nutritional yeast
1/2 tsp oregano, minced (1/4 tsp dry)
1/2 tsp thyme, minced (1/4 tsp dry)
1/2 tsp sea salt, or to taste
1/4 tsp Black pepper, ground to taste
1/4 tsp Sage, minced
Soak tomatoes in warm water for 20 minutes. Drain and set aside 1/2 C soak water.
Place in blender with remaining ingredients and blend until smooth.

Pesto Perfecto
10 minutes/ 1cup
1 Cup Basil, tightly packed
1/4 Cup Cashews, macadamia, or pine nuts
1/4 to 1/2 C Olive Oil
2 Tbl Lemon juice, squeezed fresh
2-3 cloves of garlic
1/2 tsp Nama Shoyu or to taste (optional)
1/2 tsp Sea salt, or to taste
Pinch of Cayenne Pepper
Place all ingredients in food processor and process until smooth

Raw PIzza

Plato’s Live Greek Pizza

4-6 hours soaking/12-15 hours dehydrating/2-3 servings

1 C Raw buckwheat grouts (soaked for 4-6 hours)

1 C Macadamia nuts soaked and drained

3 Tbl Flax seed, ground

2 1/2 Tbl Herbs, minced (try basil and parsley)

1 Tbl Lemon juice, fresh squeezed

Pinch Crushed red peppers

  • Sea Salt, to tast
  • Black Pepper, ground to taste
  • Nama shoyu to taste (optional)

Cheez

1 Cup Cashew Nut cheez (recipe below)

Sauce

1 Cup Live Tomato (recipe below)

Toppings

  • Sun dried tomatoes, olives, basil, fresh mushrooms, or other veggies

Preparation

  1. Prepare Nut Cheez the night below (see below)
  2. Soak buckwheat, rinsing and replacing water periodically. Rinse and drain well one last time, place in food processor with remaining crust ingredients and process until smooth.
  3. Carefully lay out 1/2” think circle layer on Teflex dehydrator sheet. Dehydrate at 115 degrees until crust is dry, approximately 12-15 hours, flipping once to ensure even drying. Transfer directly to a mesh screen dehydrator tray.
  4. Prepare Live Tomato Sauce or Pesto sauce spread on top of crust, add fresh vegetable toppings.

Cheez Cashew

2 C Cashews

1 C Filtered Water

1/3 cup red bell pepper, diced

2 1/2 Tbl green onion diced

2 Tbl Cilantro

1 tsp Garlic, minced

1 tsp, Nama Shoyum or to taste

1/4 tsp  Sea Salt

Pinch Curshed red pepper flakes

  1.  Blend cashews with filtered water until very smooth. Place in a 1/2 gallon open-mouthed jar. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and secure with rubber band. Cover with a towel and allow to sit in a warm place overnight. 
  2. Pour cashew mixture into large mixing bowl, combine with remaining ingredients and mix well.

Variations

~Can be made with macadamia nuts or pine nuts.

~Replace cilantro with other fresh herbs.

Live Tomato Sauce

20 minites for 2 1/2 cups

2 C Roma tomatoes, chopped

1/4 C Sundried tomatoes soaked in warm water until soft

2 Tbl beets, grated

2 Tbl Oiive oil

1 Tbl Basil, minced

1 Tbl Italian parsley, minced

1 tsp Nama shoyu, or to taste

1 tsp Nutritional yeast

1/2 tsp oregano, minced (1/4 tsp dry)

1/2 tsp thyme, minced (1/4 tsp dry)

1/2 tsp sea salt, or to taste

1/4 tsp Black pepper, ground to taste

1/4 tsp Sage, minced

  1. Soak tomatoes in warm water for 20 minutes. Drain and set aside 1/2 C soak water.
  2. Place in blender with remaining ingredients and blend until smooth.

Pesto Perfecto

10 minutes/ 1cup

1 Cup Basil, tightly packed

1/4 Cup Cashews, macadamia, or pine nuts

1/4 to 1/2 C Olive Oil

2 Tbl Lemon juice, squeezed fresh

2-3 cloves of garlic

1/2 tsp Nama Shoyu or to taste (optional)

1/2 tsp Sea salt, or to taste

Pinch of Cayenne Pepper

  1. Place all ingredients in food processor and process until smooth

Watercress Salad: 
Watercress 
Avocado
Fatima Flax Dressing (see last post for recipe)
_________________________________________________________________

Health Benefits of Watercress

The health benefits of watercress have beenknown since ancient days, when it was usedas an aphrodisiac by royalty.
Description
Watercress (Nasturtium officinalis) is a semi-aquatic perennial herb belonging to the family of Brassicaceae, which has been known since time immemorial for its flavoring, therapeutic and aphrodisiac properties.
Watercress usually grows along the banks of slow-running streams and rivers in Europe, Asia and America. It is characterized by its small, round leaves, with a pungent, peppery flavor. The small white flowers appear in flat clusters are called corymbs.

The fresh, tender leaves of watercress have to be harvested just before flowering, because after flowering they become bitter and are no longer good to eat.
Watercress has a variety of uses, either as a flavoring herb or as a medicinal herb. In addition, watercress juice can be added to other vegetable juices to give them flavor and health benefits.

Nutritional Benefits
Watercress is rich in fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamin C, beta-carotene, folate, potassium, calcium, phosphorous and iron, and is a good source of iodine as well. In fact, it has more calcium than milk and more iron than spinach.
Its main active principles are classified as thyoglycosides (glycosides containing sulfur)—an anti-thrombosis with a mild anti-coagulant effect. Watercress also contain moderate amounts of vitamins B1 and B2, zinc, copper and manganese.

Health Benefits
Watercress has plenty of health and therapeutic properties. However, due to its strong, pungent and bitter taste, it is never used alone, but is always added to juices, salads or other dishes as an ingredient, flavor or garnish.
Anti-anemic effect:  Watercress is particularly helpful in treating different types of anemia due to its high content in iron. Iron is essential for the synthesis of hemoglobin, and folic acid, which plays a key role in the maturation of red cells in the bone marrow. The right amount of vitamin C in watercress also makes better absorption of iron.
Anti-inflammatory properties:  Watercress is rich in vitamin C, which has an anti-inflammatory action and can help prevent or relieve the symptoms of cold, flu and other types of inflammation.
Anti-oxidant and anti-cancer effects:  Just as many other herbs, watercress is rich in anti-oxidants. Anti-oxidant substances help prevent or fight the damage caused by free radicals to body tissues, thereby contributing to prevent premature aging, as well as lower the risk of developing cancer and many other chronic or degenerative diseases.
Aphrodisiac effect:  Several historical sources show that watercress has been used for its aphrodisiac effect since the age of the ancient Romans and Persians. This could be due to its high zinc and iron content.
Blood glucose:  Although not definitely proven, it seems that watercress can help control blood sugar levels and prevent or treat high blood glucose. It is probable that the hypoglycemic effect of watercress is in part due to its high content in soluble fiber, that helps reduce the absorption of carbohydrates from the intestine. This effect is particularly helpful for individuals with diabetes.
Bone health:  The right proportion of calcium, magnesium, manganese, vitamins A, C and K in watercress helps promote and maintain healthy and strong bones.
Cough:  The sulphur glycosides found in watercress have been shown to modify bronchial secretions and exert an expectorant effect, which can be used to treat many forms of chronic bronchitis.
Digestive function:  Watercress does improve digestive function, due to its high content in vitamin C and fiber, which stimulate salivary and gastric secretions and the motility of the intestinal tract respectively.
DNA, preserve:  In a laboratory test, it was found that daily consumption of watercress increase the ability of cells to resist DNA damages to lymphocytes (white blood cells).
Eye health:  The high content in phytonutrients lutein and zeaxanthin are potent anti-oxidants; together with vitamin A and zinc all in this herb help greatly improve eye health.
Hair health:  Watercress can be used topically to treat dandruff and prevent hair loss, due to its sulfur, iron, zinc and vitamin A content. The best results are obtained by rubbing the scalp and the hair with a watercress tincture.
Hangover:  A hangover happens when the liver gets overloaded with toxic alcohol. Watercress juice is so concentrated with so much cleansing goodness that it activates the detoxifying enzymes in the liver for detoxifying a hangover.
Purifying effect:  Watercress has been used for centuries for its purifying effects. It enhances the diuresis and helps give the colon a good “spring-cleaning”, thereby effectively removing toxins from the body.
Skin health:  When used topically, watercress juice can be helpful in relieving skin eczema, as well as other skin conditions. Its high content of vitamin A and C best obtained by juicing are also beneficial for healthy skin.
Teeth:  Chewing watercress makes teeth stronger. It also cures bleeding of the gum or gingivitis.
Thyroid gland:  The high iodine content in watercress can help prevent goitre, improve the function of the thyroid gland and relieve the symptoms of many forms of hypothyroidism.

Consumption Tips
Watercress can be used as a basic ingredient for salads (using the leaves), sauces, or in soups. Watercress juice can be added to a variety of vegetable juices, to give them flavor and health benefits.

On its own, watercress juice is very strong and bitter. Like wheatgrass which is very potent, do not take more than two ounces of this concentrated green juice each time, mix it with other juices to make it more palatable and easy on the stomach. It blends very well with juices of carrot, potato, spinach and turnip leaves. Throw in some parsley too for their synergistic healing power. Squeeze in half a lemon to reduce its pungent taste.
The Chinese people like to boil watercress soup (with ingredients like dates, carrots, ginseng, gojiberries, black pepper, ginger, etc.). No doubt some nutrients are destroyed in the heat; phytonutrients cannot be destroyed but will leach into the soup. Discard the leaves.


Watercress Salad: 

Watercress 

Avocado

Fatima Flax Dressing (see last post for recipe)

_________________________________________________________________

Health Benefits of Watercress

The health benefits of watercress have been
known since ancient days, when it was used
as an aphrodisiac by royalty.

Description

Watercress (Nasturtium officinalis) is a semi-aquatic perennial herb belonging to the family of Brassicaceae, which has been known since time immemorial for its flavoring, therapeutic and aphrodisiac properties.

Watercress usually grows along the banks of slow-running streams and rivers in Europe, Asia and America. It is characterized by its small, round leaves, with a pungent, peppery flavor. The small white flowers appear in flat clusters are called corymbs.

The fresh, tender leaves of watercress have to be harvested just before flowering, because after flowering they become bitter and are no longer good to eat.

Watercress has a variety of uses, either as a flavoring herb or as a medicinal herb. In addition, watercress juice can be added to other vegetable juices to give them flavor and health benefits.

Nutritional Benefits

Watercress is rich in fiber, anti-oxidants, vitamin C, beta-carotene, folate, potassium, calcium, phosphorous and iron, and is a good source of iodine as well. In fact, it has more calcium than milk and more iron than spinach.

Its main active principles are classified as thyoglycosides (glycosides containing sulfur)—an anti-thrombosis with a mild anti-coagulant effect. Watercress also contain moderate amounts of vitamins B1 and B2, zinc, copper and manganese.

Health Benefits

Watercress has plenty of health and therapeutic properties. However, due to its strong, pungent and bitter taste, it is never used alone, but is always added to juices, salads or other dishes as an ingredient, flavor or garnish.

Anti-anemic effect:  Watercress is particularly helpful in treating different types of anemia due to its high content in iron. Iron is essential for the synthesis of hemoglobin, and folic acid, which plays a key role in the maturation of red cells in the bone marrow. The right amount of vitamin C in watercress also makes better absorption of iron.

Anti-inflammatory properties:  Watercress is rich in vitamin C, which has an anti-inflammatory action and can help prevent or relieve the symptoms of cold, flu and other types of inflammation.

Anti-oxidant and anti-cancer effects:  Just as many other herbs, watercress is rich in anti-oxidants. Anti-oxidant substances help prevent or fight the damage caused by free radicals to body tissues, thereby contributing to prevent premature aging, as well as lower the risk of developing cancer and many other chronic or degenerative diseases.

Aphrodisiac effect:  Several historical sources show that watercress has been used for its aphrodisiac effect since the age of the ancient Romans and Persians. This could be due to its high zinc and iron content.

Blood glucose:  Although not definitely proven, it seems that watercress can help control blood sugar levels and prevent or treat high blood glucose. It is probable that the hypoglycemic effect of watercress is in part due to its high content in soluble fiber, that helps reduce the absorption of carbohydrates from the intestine. This effect is particularly helpful for individuals with diabetes.

Bone health:  The right proportion of calcium, magnesium, manganese, vitamins A, C and K in watercress helps promote and maintain healthy and strong bones.

Cough:  The sulphur glycosides found in watercress have been shown to modify bronchial secretions and exert an expectorant effect, which can be used to treat many forms of chronic bronchitis.

Digestive function:  Watercress does improve digestive function, due to its high content in vitamin C and fiber, which stimulate salivary and gastric secretions and the motility of the intestinal tract respectively.

DNA, preserve:  In a laboratory test, it was found that daily consumption of watercress increase the ability of cells to resist DNA damages to lymphocytes (white blood cells).

Eye health:  The high content in phytonutrients lutein and zeaxanthin are potent anti-oxidants; together with vitamin A and zinc all in this herb help greatly improve eye health.

Hair health:  Watercress can be used topically to treat dandruff and prevent hair loss, due to its sulfur, iron, zinc and vitamin A content. The best results are obtained by rubbing the scalp and the hair with a watercress tincture.

Hangover:  A hangover happens when the liver gets overloaded with toxic alcohol. Watercress juice is so concentrated with so much cleansing goodness that it activates the detoxifying enzymes in the liver for detoxifying a hangover.

Purifying effect:  Watercress has been used for centuries for its purifying effects. It enhances the diuresis and helps give the colon a good “spring-cleaning”, thereby effectively removing toxins from the body.

Skin health:  When used topically, watercress juice can be helpful in relieving skin eczema, as well as other skin conditions. Its high content of vitamin A and C best obtained by juicing are also beneficial for healthy skin.

Teeth:  Chewing watercress makes teeth stronger. It also cures bleeding of the gum or gingivitis.

Thyroid gland:  The high iodine content in watercress can help prevent goitre, improve the function of the thyroid gland and relieve the symptoms of many forms of hypothyroidism.

Consumption Tips

Watercress can be used as a basic ingredient for salads (using the leaves), sauces, or in soups. Watercress juice can be added to a variety of vegetable juices, to give them flavor and health benefits.

On its own, watercress juice is very strong and bitter. Like wheatgrass which is very potent, do not take more than two ounces of this concentrated green juice each time, mix it with other juices to make it more palatable and easy on the stomach. It blends very well with juices of carrot, potato, spinach and turnip leaves. Throw in some parsley too for their synergistic healing power. Squeeze in half a lemon to reduce its pungent taste.

The Chinese people like to boil watercress soup (with ingredients like dates, carrots, ginseng, gojiberries, black pepper, ginger, etc.). No doubt some nutrients are destroyed in the heat; phytonutrients cannot be destroyed but will leach into the soup. Discard the leaves.

Fatima’s Flax Dressing

10 minutes/1/2 cup

Ingredients

  • 1/4 C Flax Seed oil
  • 1 Tbl Filtered Water
  • 1 Tbl Lemmon juice, fresh squeezed
  • 1 tbl Cilantro or other fresh herbs. minced
  • 1 1/4 tsp Nama Shoyu, or to taste
  • 1 tsp Apple Cider Vinegar, raw
  • 1/2 tsp Garlic. minced (optional)
  • dash Agave nectar
  • pinch of Cayenne pepper

Place all ingredients in small bowl and mix well.

Source: Vegan World Fusion Cuisine

Uma’s Maple Balsamic Vinaigrette

5 minutes/ 2 cups

  • 2/3 C Filtered Water
  • 1/2 C Olive Oil
  • 1/4 c Balsimic Vinegar
  • 2 1/2 Tbl Maple syrup
  • 1 1/2 Tbl Nama shoyu
  • 1 Tbl Stone ground mustard

Place all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk well.

Source: Vegan World Fusion Cuisine

Raw Collard Salad

Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 bunch collard greens, washed
  • ⅛ cup olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 6-8 chopped sun-dried tomatoes
  • ⅓ cup onion, chopped
  • 1-3 cloves raw garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
Instructions
  1. De-stem and chop the collard greens. An easy way to de-stem collard greens is by folding them in half lengthwise along the stem with the darker green side down and then pull up the stem until it comes off and you’re left mostly with leaf. An easy way to chop the collards is to stack a few leaves, roll them up into a cigar shape and cut the through the collard cylinder, making strips.
  2. Place strips in a large bowl. Pour olive oil on collard strips and sprinkle on salt. Massage the oil and salt into the strips with your hands until all pieces are well coated.
  3. Whisk together apple cider vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes, onions, garlic, red pepper flakes and ground pepper.
  4. Pour apple cider vinegar dressing over the collard green strips. Let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 3-4 hours, but overnight is best.

Adapted from www.eatingbirdfood.com

Raw Vegan “Tastes LIke Fried Chicken But Isn’t” Nuggets

image

1 cup pecans

1 container sprouted chick peas 

1 cup celery root, peeled and chunked

1/4 cup golden flax meal

1/4 nutritional yeast “nooch”

2 tablespoons coconut oil

1 tablespoon sweet white miso 

3 tablespoons almond butter

pinch of celtic sea salt

in bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal “S” blade, add the pecans. Pulse until coarsely ground. Add the chick peas and celery roots. Process until everything is a coarse meal, like the texture of raw quinoa. Dump this mixture into a work bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients and using your hands, mix it into a homogeneous mixture.

Breading

1/2 cup ground golden flax meal

1/2 cup nutritional yeast flakes, “nooch”

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon granulated garlic

1 teaspoon onion powder

1/2 teaspoon dried dill

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried mustard

2 teaspoons dried paprika

Mix all of the ingredients in bowl.

To form the nuggets, use a small cream scooper with the sweep arm. Shape each ball into a log or nugget shape. Roll in the breading mixture to coat completely. Place each on the mesh screen of dehydrator tray. Dehydrate for 25 to 30 hours at 115 degrees. The outside should be dry, while the inside remain moist.

Peace Habanero Dipping Sauce (raw vegan)

1 1/2 peach chunks (frozen is okay, but use organic if possible)

Juice of a Lemon

5 Medjool dates, pitted and soaked for several hours ( reserve the date soaking water)

Fresh habanero pepper, seeded (use whatever amount you want, depending on heat level desired)

PInch of Celt sea salt


Adapted from Melanie Stewart

Yale [researchers] published … a paper titled, “Can We Say What Diet Is Best for Health?” In it, they compare the major diets of the day: Low carb, low fat, low glycemic, Mediterranean, mixed/balanced (DASH), Paleolithic, vegan, and elements of other diets. Despite the pervasiveness of these diets in culture and media, Katz and Meller write, “There have been no rigorous, long-term studies comparing contenders for best diet laurels using methodology that precludes bias and confounding. For many reasons, such studies are unlikely.” They conclude that no diet is clearly best, but there are common elements across eating patterns that are proven to be beneficial to health. “A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention.”
-

Important new nutrition study confirms that Michael Pollan had it right all along in his now-legendary Food Rules.

(via The Dish)